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assault LAWYER | CALGARY

DEFENDING assault CASES in calgary since 1999


FREE CONSULTATION: (403) 452-8018

calgary assault lawyer


In criminal law “assault” is any direct or indirect intentional and non-consensual physical touching of another person.  The concepts of “direct” and “indirect” physical touching are important because to commit an assault a person need not actually (or directly) touch the complainant.  An assaultive gesture may constitute an indirect assault.  With this in mind, it is important to understand that a criminal assault does not require a degree of force.

There are a variety of types of assault.  The most basic kind of assault is often called a “common assault”.  This kind of assault usually attracts the lightest type of sentences.  More serious kinds of assault are those that involve weapons and/or bodily injury.  Accordingly, there are separate charges for “assault with a weapon”, “assault causing bodily harm” and “aggravated assault”.  The elements to each of these aggravated versions speak for themselves.  For example, assault with a weapon entails the use of a weapon. Assault causing bodily harm results in injury that is neither trivial nor transitory. Aggravated assault involves reasonable foreseeability that the assault will “wound”, “maim” or “disfigure”.

As the seriousness of the assault increases, the sanction or sentence attracted increases.  
The importance of defending an assault charge is obvious. If convicted you will likely have a criminal record.  Since assault is a crime of violence, there is some possibility that your ability to travel abroad may be restricted.

Defending an assault involves consideration of a myriad of defences: self defence, consent, identification, de minimus, mens rea and actus reus.

I understand all of the available defences.  I have researched the law relating to all types of assaults and have experience cross-examining complainants regarding their role in the altercation.  I routinely successfully defend assault allegations and regularly obtain favourable results without having to litigate the charge(s) at trial.

For a Calgary criminal lawyer who defends assault, uttering threats and all crimes of violence call 403.452.8018.  

David Chow defends cases in Calgary, Lethbridge, Brooks, Cochrane and throughout Alberta.

Recent Case Results

R. v. B.D.R.

July 22, 2020

(Calgary, P.C. - PPT).  BDR sought judicial interim release (bail) in relation to a plethora of charges, including: cocaine trafficking in Calgary, possession for the purpose of trafficking, unlawful discharge of a firearm, breach of recognizance and failing to appear in court. In R. v. Antic the Supreme Court of Canada recently re-affirmed cornerstone principles ingrained into Canada's criminal law: the presumption of innocence and the right to reasonable bail. With respect to judicial interim release (or bail), the Supreme Court was very clear that all persons accused of crime are presumed innocent until proven guilty and have a right to reasonable bail unless there is "just cause" to believe that detention is necessary. The narrow set of circumstances for detention include: unmanageable flight risk, the risk of new criminal offences that will endanger the public and the loss of public confidence in the administration of justice. For BDR the strength of the crown's case was highlighted; this included serious issues with the Crown's ability to identify the accused as the perpetrator of any crime. Since BDR was charged with trafficking and firearms offences, the onus on bail was reversed -- meaning, he had to show cause for release. Though there were many Calgary criminal lawyers to choose from, BDR hired David Chow -- a Calgary drug lawyer, firearms lawyer and full service criminal defence lawyer with nearly two-decades of experience defending cases in Court. As result of showing weaknesses in the Crown's case, BDR was granted judicial interim release. Bail is critical to the defence of any case. If you are looking to retain a Calgary bail lawyer, call David Chow for a free consultation. 

R. v. T.Y.

July 3, 2020

(Calgary, P.C. - Assaulting a Police Officer). On June 10th, 2020 TY discovered charges were laid against her on March 6th, 2020 in relation to an incident with police in the family home on October 22nd, 2019. This was discovered after TY lodged a complaint with the City of Calgary Police Service (CPS) and after a video taken by a family member showed something not, in the opinion of this Calgary criminal lawyer, consistent with the accused committing any crime at all. TY went public to support the outcry for police reform following the death of George Floyd on May 25th, 2020. The accused was shocked to learn that charges had been laid months earlier without notice of any court appearance. A police spokesperson claimed that the reason for failed service of a summons was "COVID" -- a claim that arguably defies logic. The incident happened in October 2019 (4 months prior to charges being laid). Calgary was not shut down as a result of Covid until after March 13, but of course, police were considered an essential service. Police continued to collect full salaries during the lockdown. Most importantly, for the purpose of "serving" documents, COVID was a perfect opportunity to locate the person subject to service, for he or she would be expected to found in their home. It is also not insignificant that counsel for TY communicated with police in October and November 2019, offering to accept service of court documents by fax or scan and email. The point is, it appears TY was targeted by a questionably motivated criminal charge, later followed by dubious justifications by third-parties within the police department about failed process. On July 3rd, 2020 the Calgary Crown Prosecutor's Office took swift action, withdrawing the criminal allegations against TY -- her complaint against the officers remains outstanding. If you have been charged with assaulting a police officer or any crime of violence, contact experienced Calgary criminal lawyers for advice. To read about David Chow's perspective on police read "Police Reform: Peace, Respect and Trust". 

R. v. Z.B.

June 15, 2020

(Calgary, P.C. - Assault).  The best way to describe ZB was as an honest, ordinary, hardworking person who had never up until one evening at a local drinking establishment, been in trouble with the law. Unfortunately for ZB, overconsumption of alcohol played a role in some poor decision making. ZB was accused of a minor assault. Fortunately, Canada's criminal justice system has space for impulsive, first time accused persons who may have engaged in rare behaviour. In this case, the Crown saw no reason to saddle ZB with the potential permanency of a criminal record and agreed to admission into the Alternative Measures Program (AMP). Though ZB may have had some defences at trial, the Alternative Measures Program offered a guaranteed second chance (as long as the program was completed). ZB took every reasonable step to complete AMP but ultimate completion was derailed as a result of COVID-19. The Prosecutor recognized ZB's efforts and withdrew the assault charge despite the fact some community service hours were outstanding. ZB concluded the criminal case without attracting a criminal record. If you are searching for a Calgary criminal lawyer to assist with your case, give David Chow a call -- he can help.

R. v. D.J.J.

February 21, 2020

(Whitehorse, S.C.).  DJJ was charged with aggravated assault and assault causing bodily harm arising out of an incident at an establishment in Whitehorse, Yukon.  The injuries were serious. The case was scheduled for trial at the Supreme Court of Whitehorse. The primary legal issue in the case revolved around principles relating to the assessing the credibility of the accused and evaluating the whole of the case "beyond a reasonable doubt". In this case, the Crown also tried to argue that the accused had a motive to assault the complainant. The accused hired Calgary criminal lawyer, David Chow, to defend him at trial. The trial lasted four days. The trial was highlighted by the judge excluding the evidence of motive. In the end, the trial judge had serious issues with the credibility and reliability of the crown's primary witness and found the accused "not guilty" of all charges.  David Chow is an Alberta criminal lawyer who appears in jurisdictions with the Province and outside of it.  David has defended clients in Alberta, British Columbia, Saskatchewan and the Yukon Territory. He has also appeared at all levels of court, including the Provincial and Superior Courts of Alberta, Saskatchewan and British Columbia, the Territorial Court of Yukon, the Superior Court of Yukon, the Alberta Court of Appeal, Saskatchewan Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court of Canada.  Looking for a Whitehorse criminal lawyer, consider giving David Chow a call. He offers a free telephone consultation.